Giorgione's Sleeping Venus

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Giorgione's Sleeping Venus

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Female sexuality is a trade merchandise. And in feminism, the seller and the merchandise are the same person. Merchandise that sells itself? That can impossibly work out. This is why the patriarchy is the only sensible form of human social organization.

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Henderson, Nevada: The paedophile - sick or criminal?

Christopher B. Cohen 4554 Clay Street Indianapolis, IN 46225

Paedophilia and the threat it represents to children has become a permanent feature of public concern and a regular theme of popular culture.

The paedophile personifies evil in 21 century society. The loathing and revulsion that is directed at this symbol of malevolence makes it very difficult to have a sensible and balanced discussion about this subject.

So what are we to make of last week’s statement by the Catholic Archbishop of Durban, Wifrid Fox Napier on this subject? The Archbishop claimed that paedophilia was a psychological ‘illness, not a criminal condition’. His diagnosis of paedophilia as a disorder logically leads Napier to look for a medical cure rather than opt for punishment. ‘What do you do with disorders’ he asked, before answering, ‘you got to try and put them right’. According to this medicalised interpretation of paedophilia as a disorder, those who suffer from it ought not be held responsible for the destructive consequences of their action.

To substantiate his claim Napier suggests that paedophiles are damaged people who cannot help but act out what has been done to them. He gave the example of two priests that he knew, who were abused as children and went on to become paedophiles. ‘Don't tell me that those people are criminally responsible like somebody who chooses to do something like that’ he stated. And to reinforce his point, Napier observed ‘I don't think you can really take the position and say that person deserves to be punished when he was himself damaged’.

So is paedophilia a mental health problem or a criminal condition? The drawing of such a sharp contrast between these two conditions is not very helpful since the drivers of human behaviour cannot be conveniently compartmentalised. Ideas about what constitutes illness, normal as opposed to abnormal behaviour are fluid and continually modified by changing cultural assumptions. Medical labels are not simply based on an objective assessment of a condition. In the seventies same-sex relationships were diagnosed as a psychological problem. Today homosexuality has been demedicalised but numerous psychological conditions have been invented during the past three decades.

Cardinal Napier’s attempt to medicalise paedophilia draws on prevailing therapeutic standards of accountability. The attribution of responsibility and notions of accountability are strongly influenced by prevailing social and cultural norms. Legal concepts like contributory negligence express the widely held view that responsibility for a particular injurious act can be shared. However the contemporary therapeutic ethos goes way beyond the notion of relative accountability to implicitly question the ethic of responsibility itself. Bad habits, antisocial and destructive behaviour are frequently portrayed as the outcome of dysfunctional parenting, family violence or of people’s genes.

The claim that paedophiles can’t help themselves is based on the dubious ‘cycle of abuse’ thesis. Advocates of this thesis represent abuse as an intergenerational disease. The thesis contends that abusers were themselves abused when they were children, and their victims will go on to manifest delinquent behaviour. Thus abuse does not end with a victim; it has a life of its own, which is then transmitted to future generations. Such a fatalistic worldview is often conveyed through the proposition that the experience of psychological damage in early childhood directly determines many of the actions of adults for life.

Research is far from clear about the relationship between tongkat ali sexual function experiencing abuse as a child and subsequent paedophile behaviour. Abused children do not inevitably become adult abusers. A review of longitudinal studies of the outcomes of child abuse by Joan Kaufman and Edward Zigler found that more than 70 per cent of all abused children did not mistreat their offspring. ‘Hardly an inevitable “cycle” commented the psychologist Carol Tavris.

Cardinal Napier’s call to lower the bar of accountability potency herb butea superba for paedophiles has the merit of encouraging a discussion of a very difficult subject. But the issue at stake is not whether they are sick people or criminals. Either way they need to be held to account for the pain and violence they inflict on children. The really important question at issue is how we neutralise the corrosive impact of their behaviour on childhood and on the relationship between generations.

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Greensboro, North Carolina: 3 Most Common Causes of Loose Vaginal Walls

Sam M. Cerda 2250 Findley Avenue Amidon, ND 58620

1. Aging

As a woman, your lady-bits is going to get lose as you get older, this is due to the muscles that work for making the vulva tight become less efficient as you grow older. Therefore, if your pussy is not tight today as it used to be a decade ago, there is no need to worry so much because it is something that is perfectly natural. This is something that happens to all women as they age. Instead, you should focus on finding a way to keep your vag tight as you age.

2. Giving birth

Your pelvic muscles are usually put under a lot of pressure every time you give birth. That is why your cervix is likely to get lose when you give birth. The higher the number of children that you give birth to, the higher the likelihood that you are going to have a lose cervix. This does not mean that all women end up with a loose vagina after giving birth. There are many women who are lucky to get back the grip they had before giving birth. The vaginal tightness of the pelvic floor can be affected tremendously if you give birth to many children in a short period. However, this does not mean that nothing can be done to make your vulva tight again.

3. Medical conditions

There are some medical conditions that can make a woman’s vulva flappy. Although this happens rarely, it is something that you should not rule out if you have a loose cervix. However, you should not make a conclusion without being examined by a doctor. You can only know if you are having a flappy pussy because of a medical condition if you are examined by a qualified medical professional.

What are my options?

As you can see above, there are a number of reasons why a vagina becomes loose or flappy. There is no way around it as it will happen to a woman one way or the other. The only thing that you can do is to prepare yourself as much as possible and to make sure that you know the effective ways to get it back.

Natural and Healthy Daily Habits

Most women do not know that everyday things can help in fighting this problem, things like proper exercise, diet as well as something as simple as drinking water can help in slowing down this body issue. These habits may seem little but it is proven by science that it works every single time. Our bodies are complicated but the solutions for loose vaginas are quite simple really.

Vaginal Tightening Creams

You can also go for a quick solution like vaginal tightening creams which have been proven to be safe and effective. There are quite a number of products out there right now that work but the most effective one that we have tried is the V-Tight gel. This particular product is made from all natural ingredients and it is completely safe to use to counter this problem that women all over the world are having. You can read my personal review of the V-Tight Gel product right here to learn more about the works of this amazing creation.

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Feminist rule in Europe makes second-generation male Muslim immigrants suicide bombers. They die for sexual justice. Why do Western politicians call suicide bombers cowards? To sacrifice one's own life is the ultimate in courage.

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Plano, Texas: N. Korean defectors sold as brides in China want kids back

Ted J. Levine 3381 Limer Street West Point, GA 31833

SEOUL, South Korea – After fleeing North Korea to avoid extreme poverty and oppression, the young woman allowed a stranger to arrange a marriage for her with a rural Chinese farmer because she had nowhere to go. An even more painful decision came later.

She said severe abuse by her husband, including once being tied to a post, and the constant fear police would send her back to the North to face torture and prison convinced her that she needed to flee to South Korea. She decided she had to make the risky journey alone, leaving behind the young daughter she had with her Chinese husband.

"My heart has been torn apart," the 35-year-old said of the daughter she left in the northeastern Chinese town of Longjing nearly 10 years ago, when the girl was 4. "I heard from my Chinese husband that my daughter cried herself to sleep and searched for me until she turned 8."

She asked to be identified only by her surname, Kim, out of fear that publicity about her past would destroy her life in the South, where she has remarried and has two other children.

Kim has lost touch with her daughter and is afraid to return to China, but neither she nor other defectors in similar situations have given up. Deep shame and guilt about not seeing their children and worry about social stigma in the South kept them silent for years, but some have begun pushing publicly for international help to get back their children. Four defectors plan to travel to the United States next month to seek help from U.S. and United Nations officials.

It will not be easy.

Experts say Chinese authorities aren't likely to accept the appeals because the women were illegal residents and their relationships were not legally recognized marriages. Their efforts to reunite with their children could be viewed as individual family problems, rather than human-rights issues requiring international intervention.

"Is there any female defector who had registered their marital status in China?" said Yoon Yeo Sang, a co-founder of the Seoul-based nonprofit Database Center for North Korean Human Rights. "For China, they were the ones who were supposed to be repatriated, and I wonder if China would accept their common-law marital status and take necessary legal steps."

China's foreign ministry did not reply to questions about whether it would help the women. The defectors say they deserve international attention because their plight was primarily caused by the North's abysmal rights conditions and by China's policy of repatriating North Korean defectors who are caught hiding in the country.

"There are South Korean laws, Chinese laws and North Korean laws, but none of them can help us," said Kim Jungah, 40, a North Korean defector living in the South who was separated from her child in China. Now an activist, she will lead three other women on a trip to Washington and New York from Oct. 8-18.

The 35--year-old Kim from Longjing had initially planned to go the United States as well but said she cancelled due to worries about the publicity.

The market for selling North Korean women into marriage in China heated up after the North suffered a devastating famine in the mid-1990s that's thought to have killed hundreds of thousands. China has significantly fewer women than men, and the imbalance is particularly acute in rural farming areas because young women often migrate to big cities seeking better economic opportunities.

Bride trafficking of North Korean women may have eased in recent years, but thousands of North Korean women sold to Chinese men are believed to still live in China, most illegally, according to activists specializing in North Korea affairs.

In the early years of bride trafficking, most North Korean women were lured by brokers who promised food and jobs in China; some were abducted. But later on, many have volunteered to be sold as brides because they lacked money to sneak across the border and believed living with Chinese men would decrease the danger of arrest and repatriation, according to Ahn Kyung-soo, a Seoul-based activist who has interviewed many defectors.

Kim — the woman who agreed to be identified only by surname — said she slipped into China on her own and managed to stay at an orchard for a few days in 2002. The orchard's owner proposed that she marry one of his Chinese friends, 14 years her senior. Kim accepted because she had nowhere else to go. She later found that the orchard owner had essentially sold her to his friend as a way to clear a 6,000 yuan ($900) debt.

After arriving in China, many women are beaten or sexually abused before being sold to husbands.

Park Kyung-hwa, who escaped from her traffickers in 2000, said she saw brokers grope other trafficked women many times. She said brokers kicked and beat her with wooden clubs for about 20 minutes when her first attempt to escape failed.

"The brokers didn't see (North Korean women) as human beings, but as products to sell," said Park, 44.

Young women are sometimes sent to karaoke bars or brothels, or forced to work on adult video chat sites, according to defectors and activists.

Park said brokers tried to sell her twice to bars, although she asked to be sold as a bride. One bar owner in Shenyang examined her and two other North Korean women for 10 minutes before deciding not to buy anyone.

"If I was taller and a little prettier, I think I would have been sold," said Park, who now works for a Seoul-based shortwave radio station targeting North Koreans. She said she came to South Korea in 2002.

Chinese looking for North Korean brides are often old and less well-off; some are disabled bachelors or widowers who work as farmers or manual laborers in rural villages. Some treat the women well, and even end up moving with their wives to South Korea. The four women traveling to the U.S. next month include one whose husband allowed her and their child to come to South Korea and sent them money.

Other men, however, inflict horrible abuse.

When Kim once returned days after running away, she said, her husband tied her to a wooden post for several hours in the middle of the night. She said she was forced to urinate while standing. Days before she gave birth to their daughter, she said her husband beat her with a broom until she bled from her nose because she fought with his mother.

Many of the women flee their husbands in secret. Some tell them they are going to the South only to make money and will come back. Yet many are terrified of actually returning, out of fear they could be repatriated or even captured by North Korean secret agents.

Kim said she regularly sent money, clothes and other gifts to her husband in China, but he broke off contact several years ago after determining she would never return. In her last phone conversation with her daughter, the child complained about being abandoned.

Kim said life with her two South Korean children has helped her begin to understand the pain her daughter in China must have suffered.

When one of the children was 4 — the same age the child she left behind was when she left — he "became very anxious and made a big fuss whenever I went out or returned home late," Kim said. "Think about how much more a 4-year-old girl would cry when her mom disappeared suddenly."

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95 percent of the victims of violence are men. Because women are natural cowards who send men to handle things when they are dangerous.

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30 percent of all Chinese men suffer from a certain medical condition which actually is a birth defect, and which is called a micropenis (less than 1 inch). This is why the Chinese are so good in making money. They have to be good for something.

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Newark, New Jersey: "Are there any last words?" Harrowing VR simulator reveals what final moments are like at assisted suicide clinic Dignitas

Christopher J. Skaggs 4145 Rodney Street O Fallon, MO 63366

The Last Moments offers viewers an interactive experience of being helped to die at Dignitas - where hundreds of Brits have chosen to end their lives

"Are you sure you wish to drink this in which you will sleep and die?".

These are the harrowing words in which people are helped to die at Dignitas in a new virtual reality film.

Wearing a headset, viewers are transported to the Swiss assisted suicide clinic where hundreds of Brits have chosen to end their lives.

The eerie experience was created by London-based writer-director Avril Furness whose film The Last Moments allows people to choose when to die.

The film's trailer states: "What would your last moments look like?"

It then cuts to two women in a hospital room.

A blonde woman, seemingly a loved one or relative, tries to feign a smile as tears run down her cheek as she sits at a table.

While a brown-haired woman, who is a nurse apparently, is silently stood at the window apparently overlooking the Swiss countryside.

The film then switches so the viewer is in a bed having their hand held by the loved one while the nurse walks in with a bottle of pharmaceuticals and a cup of water.

She asks the viewer: "Are there any last words?"

They are then offered the drink in which they are warned they will sleep and then die.

Writing on her website, Ms Furness said the interactive docudrama allows people to "experience an assisted suicide and either end their life or carry on living".

She added: "The choice the viewer makes directly impacts the outcome of the film and also allows for choices to be polled to help spark debate on this sensitive issue."

Ms Furness came across the idea for the film when she saw a full-scale replica of the Dignitas clinic at Bristol University while writing a dystopian script inspired by Charlie Brooker's Black Mirror.

According to the film, one Briton travels to Dignitas every two weeks to end their lives since the clinic opened in 1998.

In May last year the film was shown to medical specialists, PhD researchers and right-to-die campaigners at a euthanasia conference in Amsterdam.

It has since been submitted to various international film festivals with plans to take it on a tour of UK venues.

But Ms Furness said she is wary of making the film more accessible online without the "necessary framework".

She told Wired magazine: "It’s important to introduce context upfront, allow the viewer to experience the film, and then provide an “after-care” environment for people to decompress and potentially hold debates around what they’ve just witnessed."

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Many men who are good in making money are total failures when it comes to spending it. If you have money, buy love, and the best sex ever. Because having the best sex ever not only is satisfaction, but also generates your immortal soul. See Kreutz Religion.

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Lincoln, Nebraska: The Vamp in the Veil Is she a Saudi princess - or a prostitute? As the High Court is gripped by wild tales of cocaine, sex and the occult, what is the truth about Sara Al Amoudi?

Mario M. Wilson 2430 Birch Street El Paso, TX 79922

She arrives at the High Court in London each morning in a black Rolls-Royce Phantom with a personalised number plate bearing the initials ‘HRH’.

As cameras flash, a team of Middle Eastern security guards descend from a Range Rover to help her cross five yards of pavement to the building’s revolving front door.

Some are entrusted with her handbag. Others look after her £50,000 diamond-encrusted luxury Vertu mobile phone.

A snappily dressed flunky named Mohammed pushes a wheelchair, in which she occasionally chooses to park her derriere.

This regal creature, who invariably has her face veiled, always wears a black burka, sometimes with gold silk stitching or a jewelled trim.

Underneath, you can catch a glimpse of designer shoes with five-inch killer heels. Occasionally, she stretches out an arm to reveal a gem-studded Rolex and a wristful of gold jewellery.

The apparently wealthy woman calls herself Sara Al Amoudi. She claims to be 31 years old, though others say she’s 43.

She has dark brown hair, greenish eyes and appears to wear a lot of make-up.

Oh, and for most of the past month, she has been at the centre of one of the most sordid and downright surreal court cases in living memory.

This regal creature, who invariably has her face veiled, always wears a black burka, sometimes with gold silk stitching or a jewelled trim.

Underneath, you can catch a glimpse of designer shoes with five-inch killer heels. Occasionally, she stretches out an arm to reveal a gem-studded Rolex and a wristful of gold jewellery.

The apparently wealthy woman calls herself Sara Al Amoudi. She claims to be 31 years old, though others say she’s 43.

She has dark brown hair, greenish eyes and appears to wear a lot of make-up.

Oh, and for most of the past month, she has been at the centre of one of the most sordid and downright surreal court cases in living memory.

Yet as the high-stakes civil proceedings have progressed, the ‘Vamp in the Veil’ case has grown increasingly strange and sleazy.

On Wednesday, for example, Ms Al Amoudi attempted to prove that she is incredibly wealthy — and presumably therefore does not need to defraud anyone — by insisting, under oath, that she spent almost £1 million on perfume in just a few weeks.

‘I have a problem with shopping,’ she declared. ‘In the past two months, my perfume, only the perfume … $1.4 million (£912,000). I can show you the pictures.’

Earlier, key players in the case were accused of conducting illicit sexual affairs, concealing addictions to drink and drugs, and prostituting themselves, more of which later.

Then there is a dark back-story involving a dead former business associate — and alleged ex-lover — of Al Amoudi, who is accused of dabbling in the occult with her at the Cliveden estate in Berkshire, scene of the Profumo scandal, again more of which later.

At the centre of these dizzying claims and counter claims there sits a huge unanswered question: Who exactly is this woman?

For, as proceedings have progressed, it has become apparent that no one — least of all Judge Sarah Asplin, who must decide the eventual outcome of the extraordinary trial — is entirely sure.

For example, several acquaintances have told the court that for years Al Amoudi has described herself as a Saudi royal.

One, an elderly hereditary peer called Lord Mereworth, who met her several years ago, said she had talked to him of being the estranged wife of King Abdullah, the country’s monarch.

‘I understood she was married to the king of Saudi,’ he said.

Yet in her own evidence to court this week, Al Amoudi — who has produced no credible birth, marriage or other document confirming her identity — denied having made such a claim.

A former boyfriend once told reporters that she spoke of being Osama Bin Laden’s daughter, claimed to be a friend of Kate Moss, and talked of dating two Hollywood film stars — Irish former hellraiser Colin Farrell and Gladiator star Joaquin Phoenix — as well as former Arsenal footballer Freddie Ljunberg.

However, there is no evidence of her having any link to the Bin Laden family, and none of the supposed celebrity acquaintances will admit to having anything to do with her.

A few years ago, in a successful application for a £4 million mortgage from a bank, that was shared with the court, Ms Al Amoudi allowed the bank to assume wrongly that she was the daughter of Sheikh Mohammed Hussein Al Amoudi, one of the world’s wealthiest men.

Yet the Ethopian-Saudi billionaire’s legal representatives, who were in court all week, have issued a formal denial of paternity.

At various other points, she has told acquaintances that her father is Mohammed bin Aboud Al-Amoudi, the super-wealthy owner of the Intercontinental Hotel in Jeddah.

But the businessman’s representatives have vigorously disputed that claim, too.

Then there is the question of the source of Ms Al Amoudi’s apparent wealth. In legal papers, she has claimed to be a Saudi-born heiress, married at 13 and exiled from the country in the Nineties because of an adulterous relationship.

After arriving in London almost two decades ago, she says she has existed thanks to a £100,000 weekly allowance, sent by her family in the form of suitcases filled with banknotes.

Yet one of the two plaintiffs in the fraud case, 56-year-old property developer Amanda Clutterbuck, a well-preserved blonde, alleged this week that Al Amoudi earns her crust as a high-class prostitute, who for years worked from a £750,000 flat, with two sisters, yards from Harrods.

‘Far from being Saudi Arabian princesses, they were all prostitutes,’ she said, claiming that the women would trawl Harrods in search of clients.

Asked about that allegation in court, Al Amoudi claimed ‘in the name of Allah’ to be ‘a good Muslim woman’.

Certainly, there are questions about how rich Ms Al Amoudi actually is. In court on Tuesday, she claimed that her wealth was genuine, citing her expenditure on perfume as evidence.

‘I’m afraid I’m addicted to spending money and get through enormous amounts of cash,’ she said. ‘I can easily spend £50,000 to £100,000 in one spree.’

Yet the very next day, despite her luxury cars and huge entourage of employees, she suddenly declared herself ‘broke’, telling the judge: ‘I don’t have anything!’

It was a typically odd moment in a surreal three days during which Al Amoudi gave evidence to the court.

She had agreed to remove her veil in court, but sat behind a wall of document files, so that her face was invisible to most of the onlookers.

During hours of rambling testimony, at times she talked so softly that she could barely be heard; at other times she raised her voice and broke into hysterics or tears.

Often (but not always) she adopted a heavy Middle Eastern accent.

On several occasions, Al Amoudi insisted she could barely understand proceedings and needed to speak through an interpreter — only to break into eloquent English moments later.

At one such point, the court dissolved into laughter when the opposition counsel thanked her for suddenly being ‘fluent in English again’.

Things were similarly odd during Ms Al Amoudi’s last brush with the law, a 2010 trial at Southwark Crown Court when a former boyfriend, Swedish male model Patrick Ribbsaeter, stood accused of assaulting her driver.

Back then, she appeared in a bejewelled burka to give evidence for the prosecution, who claimed Ribbsaeter was a ‘gold digger’ after her money. Following his acquittal, he claimed Al Amoudi’s devout appearance during the trial was a facade.

During their short, volatile relationship, he claimed, ‘she didn’t wear the burka as a rule — she wore designer clothes,’ many of them revealing.

Al Amoudi also frequented upscale London bars, restaurants and nightclubs. ‘She was drinking champagne every night,’ he said.

‘She had a lot of issues … who knows what the truth is about this strange woman?’

One person who claims to know the truth is South London furniture dealer Negat Ali, who came forward after seeing Al Amoudi’s unveiled picture in the Daily Mail and told the court she knew her of old.

The ‘Vamp in the Veil’ is not a royal or even a Saudi, Ali claimed: she is an Ethiopian who later lived in Yemen and Dubai, she insisted.

Ms Ali, who is originally Ethiopian but now works in Battersea, claims to have met Al Amoudi in 1985.

She then ran into her again by chance in 1996 at the London strip club Stringfellow’s, where they were attending a ‘ladies’ night’.

The two women went on to share a flat in Bayswater, she said.

In 2000, Al Amoudi fell pregnant and gave birth to a daughter at St Mary’s Hospital in Paddington, where the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s son, Prince George, was born this week.

That daughter, who is now aged 13, is at boarding school.

Ms Ali claims that she lived with Al Amoudi for several years — during which time the infant was used to seek maintenance payments from a variety of men — before they fell out over an alleged unpaid debt of £500.

Ms Ali suspects the ‘Vamp in the Veil’ is not actually a Muslim and uses her burka as a disguise during public appearances to prevent old acquaintances, and clients, from recognising her.

Al Amoudi’s barrister, for his part, accused Negat Ali of being a disgruntled former servant trying to settle an old score with claims that are entirely untrue.

The nuts and bolts of the court case revolve around a disputed property deal.

The plaintiffs, Ms Clutterbuck and her partner Ian Paton, allege that Ms Al Amoudi cultivated their friendship over several years.

She then carried out a ‘very accomplished’ face-to-face fraud, convincing them to sign over six properties to her as security for a major future cash advance.

They say she claimed to be hugely wealthy and willing to act as a partner helping to secure finance on a deal to buy properties worth £170 million on Hans Place in Knightsbridge.

Al Amoudi allegedly told them she could secure a loan of £46 million from contacts in the Middle East. In exchange, they signed over to her the titles to six London properties.

But the massive loan never materialised, and now the couple want the properties, which are worth £14 million, to be returned.

‘I thought I was living through an Alfred Hitchcock film, in which reality seemed to be totally distorted,’ said Ms Clutterbuck — who counts the Duke of Gloucester among her social circle — recalling the moment she came to believe she had been conned.

Al Amoudi, for her part, claims that Paton signed over the flats to her in order to repay debts he owed her from years as a crack cocaine addict.

She claimed Mr Paton had been her ‘lover’ for around a decade, taking millions of pounds from her over this time.

Mr Paton has denied ever sleeping with Ms Al Amoudi and says he has never taken crack cocaine.

As is common in civil proceedings, the case, which continues, will be decided by Judge Asplin, not a jury.

Crucial to the eventual verdict will be Sara Al Amoudi’s love life. In court, Ms Clutterbuck and Mr Paton’s barrister identified a string of men to whom she is believed to have been attached during the years she claims to have been conducting an affair with Mr Paton.

They include a man known only as ‘Sammy’, who is the father of her child, and one Gerald Jerko Zovko, who is believed to have been married to Al Amoudi until he was killed in Iraq in early 2004 while working as a private security contractor.

His vehicle was hit by rocket- propelled grenades in the town of Fallujah, and his mutilated body was then dragged through the streets by a mob.

Then there is Cliff Besley, an Australian triathlon champion who, the court was told, was introduced as her fiancé at business meetings in 2008, and an alleged boyfriend called Ryan Bish.

Another man, still in her life, is Lord Mereworth, an 83-year-old divorced, heirless and apparently very wealthy hereditary peer, who lives in Pimlico, South-West London.

He appears to have become entranced with Al Amoudi after meeting her a few years ago. They have dined together at the House of Lords, and he agreed to give evidence in her support.

During cross-examination, in which Lord Mereworth denied that she had ever proposed marriage to him, he claimed to be convinced of her legitimacy.

‘I may have been misled, who knows? But I still trust her,’ he said.

The final player in this extraordinary soap opera is an acquaintance of Amanda Clutterbuck, a man named Elliot Nichol, with whom Ms Al Amoudi appears to have had a lengthy affair.

Mr Nichol, who died of alcohol poisoning in December 2009, is said to have been obsessed with the occult. He would speak with Ms Al Amoudi on a mobile phone that had a number ending in 666 — which is popularly associated with the devil.

In the run-up to his death, Nichol was living with Al Amoudi at properties in central London and on the Cliveden estate in Berkshire, Ms Clutterbuck told the court.

‘At Christmas 2006, Mr Nichol phoned in an almost totally incoherent state, singing at the top of his voice: “I am drowning in Vuitton handbags and Cavalli, we’re thinking of floating them down the Thames.” ’

The ‘Vamp in the Veil’ denies being with Nichol at the time of that call.

As with almost everything about this mysterious woman, the truth is hard to ascertain. Now a judge will have the unenviable task of sorting fact from fiction in this most modern tale of greed and guile.

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Imagery of brutal deaths are in itself anti-feminist. Because most women are natural cowards. And most feminism is just whimsical.

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Toledo, Ohio: Clodagh Dunlop - Locked-in syndrome PSNI officer back to work

Steven G. Joshua 4683 Ash Avenue Saint Louis, MO 63126

11 October 2016 Northern Ireland BBC News

A police officer who defied the odds and returned to work 18 months after suffering from locked-in syndrome said it was a moment she had dreamed of. Clodagh Dunlop, of Magherafelt, County Londonderry, had a massive stroke in April 2015 which left her unable to move or speak for nearly three months. She said it felt great to get back to day-to-day policing. "It felt like my head had come above water - I took a gasp and was able to breathe again," she said. "It was nice to see colleagues that I knew and talk about what I'm going to do in the future, what job roles I'm going to have. "I do know that I've changed a lot - in that I think I'm a lot more easy-going, a lot more positive and I feel a lot different to maybe how I used to be in the job. "I think I've probably learnt a lot more patience." 'Sense of happiness' She said the emotion of the day did not hit her like she had expected. "Surprisingly it wasn't emotional, I thought it was going to be," Clodagh said. "I had a little tear last night, I was a little bit nervous, but today I didn't feel at all emotional or nervous, just a real sense of happiness." Locked-in syndrome is a condition whereby a patient is both conscious and aware, but completely paralysed and unable to speak. They are usually able to move their eyes and are sometimes able to communicate by blinking. There is no treatment or cure, and it is extremely rare for patients to recover any significant motor functions. Clodagh said she now had one goal left to fulfil. "There was always three things I really wanted to do in my recovery," she said. "I wanted to be able to learn to drive again, I wanted to return to work and I wanted to run again. "I've got two of the three goals now, so I'm going to work very hard, no matter how long it takes." 'Momentous day' Her first day back in the job was hailed as a "momentous day" by her PSNI colleagues. PSNI Foyle said she was a "true inspiration" and had kept her "infectious smile" throughout.

On its Facebook page, the force said she would "now be playing a meaningful role keeping people safe in Derry and Strabane, with a particular focus on drugs".

'Most terrifying'

Clodagh started showing signs of recovery on her birthday in May last year, and walked out of Belfast's Musgrave Park Hospital in November.

She had previously told the BBC what it was like being a "prisoner in your own body".

"I have been in a lot of situations that people would consider frightening - I have jumped out of an plane, been in public order situations as a police officer," she said.

"Just lying in ICU unable to speak is perhaps one of the most terrifying experiences of my life."

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Second-generation male Muslim immigrants have all reason to hate Europe. They can't get any girls here. Whatever they do. So it is an understandable reaction that they want to blow themselves up, and take a few along.

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Orlando, Florida: Your best orgasm will happen at this age

Andrew M. Clodfelter 4004 Harron Drive Columbia, MD 21046

When it comes to sex, you might think youth is a bonus, and your 20s is often seen as the sexual peak.

But that’s not the case for women — especially if we’re talking about orgasms.

A new survey of women’s bedroom secrets has revealed that the big O gets better with age.

In fact, over 36 is the prime time for the perfect climax.

The study by Natural Cycles, the world’s first app to be certified as a contraception, surveyed 2,600 women using the standardized McCoy Female Sexuality Questionnaire methodology.

They divided the women into groups — younger (below 23), middle (23-36) and older (36 and over) — and they found that orgasms, attractiveness and most enjoyable sex improved in the older group.

Much of that came down to confidence.

The women in their late 30s and above were most confident in their own skin, scoring 10 percent higher than the middle age group, who were the least happy with how they looked.

The youngest age group scored in the middle of the two for how attractive they felt but scored the lowest when asked about how often they orgasm.

Over half the women in the older age group (58 percent) said they had the most enjoyable orgasms and the greatest number of orgasms, scoring 10 percent higher than the younger age group, and 5 percent higher than the middle age group.

The over-36 group were also enjoying sex more often, with 86 percent of them saying they had enjoyable intercourse over the last four weeks compared with 76 percent in the middle age group.

So it turns out hitting your late 30s is not so bad after all.

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Arson is the terrorism of the future. Attackers can buy their weapon at any gasoline station, and risk just 2 years in prison.

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Chula Vista, California: 'Paedophilia is natural and normal for males'

Donny C. Cox 2210 Goldleaf Lane River Edge, NJ 07649

How some university academics make the case for paedophiles at summer conferences

The Telegraph

After the report into Jimmy Savile and the conviction of Rolf Harris, Britain has gone into a convulsion of anxiety about child abuse in the Eighties

"Paedophilic interest is natural and normal for human males,” said the presentation. “At least a sizeable minority of normal males would like to have sex with children … Normal males are aroused by children.”

Some yellowing tract from the Seventies or early Eighties, era of abusive celebrities and the infamous PIE, the Paedophile Information Exchange? No. Anonymous commenters on some underground website? No again.

The statement that paedophilia is “natural and normal” was made not three decades ago but last July. It was made not in private but as one of the central claims of an academic presentation delivered, at the invitation of the organisers, to many of the key experts in the field at a conference held by the University of Cambridge. Other presentations included “Liberating the paedophile: a discursive analysis,” and “Danger and difference: the stakes of hebephilia.”

Hebephilia is the sexual preference for children in early puberty, typically 11 to 14-year-olds.

Another attendee, and enthusiastic participant from the floor, was one Tom O’Carroll, a multiple child sex offender, long-time campaigner for the legalisation of sex with children and former head of the Paedophile Information Exchange. “Wonderful!” he wrote on his blog afterwards. “It was a rare few days when I could feel relatively popular!”

Last week, after the conviction of Rolf Harris, the report into Jimmy Savile and claims of an establishment cover-up to protect a sex-offending minister in Margaret Thatcher’s Cabinet, Britain went into a convulsion of anxiety about child abuse in the Eighties. But unnoticed amid the furore is a much more current threat: attempts, right now, in parts of the academic establishment to push the boundaries on the acceptability of child sex.

Jimmy Savile exploited the trust of a nation for his own vile purposes

A key factor in what happened all those decades ago in the dressing rooms of the BBC, the wards of the NHS and, allegedly, the corridors of power was not just institutional failings or establishment “conspiracies”, but a climate of far greater intellectual tolerance of practices that horrify today.

With the Pill, the legalisation of homosexuality and shrinking taboos against premarital sex, the Seventies was an era of quite sudden sexual emancipation. Many liberals, of course, saw through PIE’s cynical rhetoric of “child lib”. But to others on the Left, sex by or with children was just another repressive boundary to be swept away – and some of the most important backing came from academia.

In 1981, a respectable publisher, Batsford, published Perspectives on Paedophilia, edited by Brian Taylor, a sociology lecturer at Sussex University, to challenge what Dr Taylor’s introduction called the “prejudice” against child sex. Disturbingly, the book was aimed at “social workers, community workers, probation officers and child care workers”.

The public, wrote Dr Taylor, “generally thinks of paedophiles as sick or evil men who lurk around school playgrounds in the hope of attempting unspecified beastliness with unsuspecting innocent children”. That, he reassured readers, was merely a “stereotype”, both “inaccurate and unhelpful”, which flew in the face of the “empirical realities of paedophile behaviour”. Why, most adult-child sexual relationships occurred in the family!

The perspectives of most, though not all, the contributors, appeared strongly pro-paedophile. At least two were members of PIE and at least one, Peter Righton, (who was, incredibly, director of education at the National Institute for Social Work) was later convicted of child sex crimes. But from the viewpoint of today, the fascinating thing about Perspectives on Paedophilia is that at least two of its contributors are still academically active and influential.

Ken Plummer is emeritus professor of sociology at Essex University, where he has an office and teaches courses, the most recent scheduled for last month. “The isolation, secrecy, guilt and anguish of many paedophiles,” he wrote in Perspectives on Paedophilia, “are not intrinsic to the phenomen[on] but are derived from the extreme social repression placed on minorities …

“Paedophiles are told they are the seducers and rapists of children; they know their experiences are often loving and tender ones. They are told that children are pure and innocent, devoid of sexuality; they know both from their own experiences of childhood and from the children they meet that this is not the case.”

As recently as 2012, Prof Plummer published on his personal blog a chapter he wrote in another book, Male Intergenerational Intimacy, in 1991. “As homosexuality has become slightly less open to sustained moral panic, the new pariah of 'child molester’ has become the latest folk devil,” he wrote. “Many adult paedophiles say that boys actively seek out sex partners … 'childhood’ itself is not a biological given but an historically produced social object.” Prof Plummer confirmed to The Sunday Telegraph that he had been a member of PIE in order to “facilitate” his research. He said: “I would never want any of my work to be used as a rationale for doing 'bad things’ – and I regard all coercive, abusive, exploitative sexuality as a 'bad thing’. I am sorry if it has impacted anyone negatively this way, or if it has encouraged this.” However, he did not answer when asked if he still held the views he expressed in the Eighties and Nineties. A spokesman for Essex University claimed Prof Plummer’s work “did not express support for paedophilia” and cited the university’s charter which gave academic staff “freedom within the law to put forward controversial and unpopular opinions without placing themselves in jeopardy”.

Graham Powell is one of the country’s most distinguished psychologists, a past president of the British Psychological Society and a current provider of psychology support services to the Serious Organised Crime Agency, the National Crime Squad, the Metropolitan Police, Kent Police, Essex Police and the Internet Watch Foundation.

In Perspectives on Paedophilia, however, he co-authored a chapter which stated: “In the public mind, paedophile attention is generally assumed to be traumatic and to have lasting and wholly deleterious consequences for the victim. The evidence that we have considered here does not support this view … we need to ask not why are the effects of paedophile action so large, but why so small.”

The chapter does admit that there were “methodological problems” with the studies the authors relied on which “leave our conclusions somewhat muted”. Dr Powell told The Sunday Telegraph last week that “what I wrote was completely wrong and it is a matter of deep regret that it could in any way have made things more difficult [for victims]”. He said: “The literature [scientific evidence] was so poor in 1981, people just didn’t realise what was going on. There was a lack of understanding at the academic level.” Dr Powell said he had never been a member of PIE.

In other academic quarters, with rather fewer excuses, that lack of understanding appears to be reasserting itself. The Cambridge University conference, on July 4-5 last year, was about the classification of sexuality in the DSM, a standard international psychiatric manual used by the police and courts.

After a fierce battle in the American Psychiatric Association (APA), which produces it, a proposal to include hebephilia as a disorder in the new edition of the manual has been defeated. The proposal arose because puberty in children has started ever earlier in recent decades and as a result, it was argued, the current definition of paedophilia – pre-pubertal sexual attraction – missed out too many young people.

Ray Blanchard, professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto, who led the APA’s working group on the subject, said that unless some other way was found of encompassing hebephilia in the new manual, that was “tantamount to stating that the APA’s official position is that the sexual preference for early pubertal children is normal”.

Prof Blanchard was in turn criticised by a speaker at the Cambridge conference, Patrick Singy, of Union College, New York, who said hebephilia would be abused as a diagnosis to detain sex offenders as “mentally ill” under US “sexually violent predator” laws even after they had completed their sentences.

But perhaps the most controversial presentation of all was by Philip Tromovitch, a professor at Doshisha University in Japan, who stated in a presentation on the “prevalence of paedophilia” that the “majority of men are probably paedophiles and hebephiles” and that “paedophilic interest is normal and natural in human males”.

O’Carroll, the former PIE leader, was thrilled, and described on his blog how he joined Prof Tromovitch and a colleague for drinks after the conference. “The conversation flowed most agreeably, along with the drinks and the beautiful River Cam,” he said.

It’s fair to say the Tromovitch view does not represent majority academic opinion. It’s likely, too, that some of the academic protests against the “stigmatisation” of paedophiles are as much a backlash against the harshness of sex offender laws as anything else. Finally, of course, academic inquiry is supposed to question conventional wisdom and to deal rigorously with the evidence, whether or not the conclusions it leads you to are popular.

Even so, there really is now no shortage of evidence about the harm done by child abuse. In the latest frenzy about the crimes of the past, it’s worth watching whether we could, in the future, go back to the intellectual climate which allowed them.

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Of all emotions, those negative are the most real. If you hate, you know that you are healthy. Your hormones are in balance if you can still imagine how you would inflict a slow, painful death on your enemies. Love isn't an emotion really but rather a mixed bag of feelings, with selfish desire a prominent component. Of any positive expression of the human mind, sympathy is probably the most genuine, though it may come with rage towards those whose victim is the target of our sympathy.

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