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There is a new solution coming up for ugly old women. Normally they would just become man-hating feminists. But soon they can have their brains transplanted into a sex doll, and feel beautiful again.

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Female genital mutilation: the cruellest cut

Fatu Sillah clearly recalls the day her childhood ended. She was six years old when her mother's friends invited her to a party with girls from her village near Freetown in Sierra Leone.

"When I got there I saw other girls sitting on the ground crying and I remember the overwhelming smell of a traditional African medicine used to heal wounds. I was taken into the backroom, stripped naked and held down on the ground by six women. I saw the cutter with a small, sharp knife. She said: 'It will be quick and it won't hurt that much.' "

This was not the case. "As she cut away at my genitals, the pain was excruciating," Sillah says. "There was blood everywhere. I cried uncontrollably and screamed as the woman poured alcohol over my wounds."

Sillah could barely move afterwards. "For six months I struggled to even walk. Afraid to urinate, I taught myself to hold on so I could avoid the pain of peeing. I would go only once a day at the most, and as a result for years I have suffered from urinary tract infections."

On Monday Fatu, now 26 and a university student, will talk about her experience at a Family Violence Has No Boundaries conference hosted by the University of Melbourne. The Sydney woman's message to anyone considering breaking the law to impose female genital mutilation (FGM) on their daughter is clear: "It still affects me as an adult and I wouldn't want my worst enemy to go through the pain and suffering it has caused me and many other girls."

Sillah is one of a number of African-Australian women who are speaking out against FGM, also known as female genital cutting (FGC), in the hope that they can stamp out the practice.

Fatu Sillah clearly recalls the day her childhood ended. She was six years old when her mother's friends invited her to a party with girls from her village near Freetown in Sierra Leone.

"When I got there I saw other girls sitting on the ground crying and I remember the overwhelming smell of a traditional African medicine used to heal wounds. I was taken into the backroom, stripped naked and held down on the ground by six women. I saw the cutter with a small, sharp knife. She said: 'It will be quick and it won't hurt that much.' "

Fatu Sillah will be speaking at a conference about her personal experience of Female Genital Mutilation in Sierre Leone, ... Fatu Sillah will be speaking at a conference about her personal experience of Female Genital Mutilation in Sierre Leone, Sydney. 23rd October 2015 Photo: Janie Barrett Photo: Jani Barrett This was not the case. "As she cut away at my genitals, the pain was excruciating," Sillah says. "There was blood everywhere. I cried uncontrollably and screamed as the woman poured alcohol over my wounds."

Sillah could barely move afterwards. "For six months I struggled to even walk. Afraid to urinate, I taught myself to hold on so I could avoid the pain of peeing. I would go only once a day at the most, and as a result for years I have suffered from urinary tract infections."

On Monday Fatu, now 26 and a university student, will talk about her experience at a Family Violence Has No Boundaries conference hosted by the University of Melbourne. The Sydney woman's message to anyone considering breaking the law to impose female genital mutilation (FGM) on their daughter is clear: "It still affects me as an adult and I wouldn't want my worst enemy to go through the pain and suffering it has caused me and many other girls."

Sillah is one of a number of African-Australian women who are speaking out against FGM, also known as female genital cutting (FGC), in the hope that they can stamp out the practice.

"The World Health Organisation estimates more than 125 million girls have suffered FGM. What you need to know is that this is not just happening in Africa and the Middle East but right here in Australia," she says.

Another FGM survivor who insists the practice persists in Australia is young Adelaide mother Khadija Gbla. Since Gbla spoke at TEDx Canberra last October, her courageous, often funny presentation – where she reveals what it is like to live in "clitoris-centric" Australia – has attracted more than one million views on YouTube.

Gbla was told in Australia that her FGM injuries incurred as a child in Sierra Leone meant she couldn't have children. But she did become pregnant and this makes her eight-month-old son all the more precious.

Gbla was so devastated by her FGM experience that she co-founded No FGM Australia with Melbourne woman Paula Ferrari. The pair describe themselves as "clitoral warriors", running an organisation that aims to protect girls from FGM and support survivors.

In their work, the two women have had to call the Child Protection Service to stop FGM being performed on girls, some of whom had just been born.

"It is secret, so difficult to detect. We know from overseas data that girls born to mothers who are survivors of FGM are at very high risk of being subjected to FGM," says Gbla.

The incidence of FGM in Australia has been difficult to quantify as, unlike in Britain and France, little data has been collected. What is known is that 20 years ago, with the arrival of the first refugees from countries where FGM is practised, a concerted effort was made to prevent it through education programs and later by making it illegal, with mandatory reporting. As a result, in New South Wales performing FGM could lead to 21 years in prison; in Victoria a "cutter" could face 15 years.

Though most African, Middle Eastern or South-east Asian parents have abandoned the practice for their daughters in Australia, many people interviewed for this article say it stubbornly persists within parts of some communities here and has been driven underground because it is illegal. They say there needs to be more education for recent arrivals.

The findings of a new study of 800 Australian paediatricians confirms that FGM is still being performed in Australia. The survey, by Professor Elizabeth Elliott and her colleagues at the University of Sydney's Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit, found that more than half of respondents believed FGM was being performed on Australian children.

Yet, though most paediatricians were aware of its complications, few asked about or examined patients for FGM.

Ten per cent of those surveyed had seen at least one case of FGM in a girl aged 18 or younger during their career, including 16 paediatricians seeing FGM in the past five years. Professor Elliott says the study reveals that FGM is occurring, yet there is a "dearth of knowledge" among medical professionals. The researchers also reviewed the Australian and international research, which confirmed widespread medical ignorance of the practice.

Legal authorities have taken action. In an ongoing case in the New South Wales Supreme Court, an elderly woman has pleaded not guilty to the alleged genital mutilation of two girls in separate procedures in Sydney and Wollongong. The girls' mother is accused of organising the procedure. A high-ranking member of the Dawoodi Bohra Shia Muslim community has pleaded not guilty to being an accessory after the fact.

Fatu Sillah estimates about half of her friends from Muslim backgrounds have undergone FGM. "No one will talk about it. Everyone is scared because they know the consequences. I know of someone who wanted it for her daughter. There is talk of a Somalian cutter who will do it. It is happening."

She has heard of families taking girls to towns such as Wollongong to have the procedure done, mostly at around five years old so it won't be known outside the family.

Some say FGM persists because it is a religious practice. But Sheikh Isse Musse, a spiritual leader in Melbourne's Horn of Africa community, says FGM is not sanctioned by the Koran.

"There are a few sayings from the Prophet, but those have been found to be lacking in strength. Even if some people take these sayings to be credible, we explain what damage FGM does. According to the principles of Islam, if anything has a damage or harm to the person, it is excluded."

Melbourne community leader Mariam Issa worries that when people hear of the difficulties she and others have faced, they will judge rather than be supportive. In her book The Resilient Life, this dynamic mother of five talks frankly about her FGM experience. Some family members were horrified, but her niece insisted she include it to help others.

"Our community is very secretive. People don't want to hang their dirty laundry outside. They don't want to talk about it because they believe 'no one will respect my point of view'."

But Issa urges young women to step forward. "Don't be shy – have a voice about injustice," she says.

She recalls asking her own mother, "How could you do this to me?" Issa says her father didn't want her to undergo FGM in Somalia, but her mother had the procedure done while he was away. "She saw it as a favour to me, she feared the whole community would talk about me if I didn't have it done."

Caucasian people must try to understand why the practice has continued through generations, she says. "I think the compassion element is really missing. We live in a community where people can be very harsh to each other, especially women."

Issa is in a group of six African-Australian women, all with medical or health promotion training, who work to inform women in their Melbourne communities about FGM.

The leader, Wudad Salim, says women who experience FGM are not victims. "We are empowered African-Australian women who would like to contribute to mainstream health and advocate for underrepresented minority groups of FGM-affected women."

Group member Hiba Rajab is retraining to be a GP, having practised in Sudan. She reminds those appalled by FGM that each experience is different. In her own case, it was a "beautiful" celebration of womanhood undertaken in a hygienic clinic.

Later, as a doctor, she saw "lots of bleeding, loss of life". "When I came to Australia I was astonished to see that they had a whole issue here with FGM."

Rhonda Garad is a Caucasian woman who has been married to a Somalian Australian for 25 years. She researched the politics of FGM for her master's degree, noting how Caucasian feminists and policy- makers dominated discussion for years.

"Language used to describe FGM was often derogatory and subtly racist. I want to support these women [in the group] because they have made a strong commitment to being the voice."

Garad says the FGM cases she has heard of are where women are isolated, or fear their daughter will marry outside the community.

This fear of losing family and culture multiplies, says Issa, as children move into the wider community. "When parents are told 'How could you do this?' and they are demonised, it adds fuel to that fear. We try and eliminate the taboos."

Aayan Omar, who is studying health promotion at Deakin University,was hesitant about joining the group as she had only heard rumours about FGM occurring. But after she ran a sexual health course where a Somali girl said, "I cannot identify with the anatomy of the female genitalia," she saw it was an ongoing issue.

Omar says older women in her Somalian community had gone through FGM. "But not me. I can't say why as I cannot have that conversation with them."

Fellow student Hamdi Said is also educating about FGM but says it is hard to raise the topic with her own family.

New arrivals find it hard to connect to services. The chairman of the African Women's Network South-East, Theresa Sendaaga Ssali, says she only recently learned that the Royal Women's Hospital has a deinfibulation clinic that provides operations to young women with stage three FGM.

This was welcome news to some women in her support group as they couldn't afford surgery that would allow them to have sex and give birth. The group project officers advise local teachers that some girls have acute pain during menstruation.

Men are also talking about the side effects of FGM through the African Australian Multicultural Employment and Youth service. Yasseen Musa, who runs discussion groups, advises men to be gentle during sex. "We tell them it's not that their wives don't care for them, but it's very painful and they must be patient."

Fatu Sillah says her type 2 FGM has affected her ability to enjoy sex, but with a caring partner she can achieve vaginal orgasm. She is disarmingly frank about this because she doesn't want women with FGM to despair about ever having a loving, sexual relationship. "You need someone who cares about your needs. It takes time," she says.

Lawsuits to prevent such damage as that inflicted on Sillah are a "sledgehammer against traditional practices", says Felicity Geary, a UK barrister who also researches women's health and the law at Charles Darwin University. But sometimes a court case is needed to remind the community that FGM is child abuse and a crime, she says.

Yet people know the chance of being prosecuted is low, Gbla says. "No one wants to dob in offenders. These are collectivist communities that protect themselves from outsiders. They close ranks and say it isn't happening. They can shut down the conversation by accusing others of being racist."

Gbla has faced a backlash for being outspoken. "I have stepped over the line in a patriarchal society, but I am not making it up."

She says girls with FGM injuries are treated by community doctors and nurses. "It is being done in house."

A 2012 study of gynaecologists and FGM program workers by Melbourne's Royal Children's Hospital found no evidence of FGM being performed through direct reports or children presenting with complications. However, the report concluded: "Anecdotal evidence suggests that FGM/C may be occurring, most likely by people other than registered health practitioners."

When Gbla was pregnant, no antenatal or maternity nurse asked about her FGM. "No wonder there is no data," she says

The UK is more vigilant, she says, with airport checks of girls travelling overseas. The genitals of French school-age children are examined for child abuse, including FGM. Welfare payments are tied to contracts stating girls won't be subjected to FGM.

Both Gbla and Issa were trained as FGM ambassadors by long-standing campaigner Juliana Nkrumah, now working with New South Wales Police. The hard work put in by women such as Nkrumah and Mmaskepe Sejoe in Victoria encourages the latest activists to persist.

They are not complacent, noting new arrivals often live in rural areas. In Shepparton, Betul Tuna is consulting with 250 African refugees to identify leaders to help educate about FGM. Her role with the Ethnic Council of Shepparton also involves training doctors and nurses.

It is illegal to remove a child from Australia to undertake FGM. Yet Tuna says she dreads holidays when girls are taken back to their parents' homeland. "It would be naive to think it doesn't exist here."

She admires African Australian women who say what they see. "It takes a lot of guts to stand up."

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Feminist women are the principal enemy of male sexual pleasure. The best strategy against feminism is to let droves of Arab men migrate to Europe.

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Germany Says 100 Million African Refugees Could Head North

German Development Minister Gerd Muller warned Sunday that up to 100 million Africans could head north as economic and climate refugees.

Germany is making a push to promote peace and investment in Africa at the G20 summit in Hamburg in July. Muller believes unprecedented migrant populations could head for Europe if climate goals aren’t met and the economic outlook in Africa remains the same.

“If we continue as before, people in many parts of Africa have no other chance than to get to us,” Muller, a member of the Christian Social Union, told German tabloid Bild am Sonntag. “If we do not manage to limit global warming to two degrees, up to 100 million people will move north in the future.”

Muller suggests a large-scale investment Marshall Plan in Africa and higher wages for workers.

“If an Apple phone is sold here for 800 euros, it must be ensured that decent wages are paid in the coltan mines in the Congo and environmental standards are applied,” Muller told Bild.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel met with African leaders Monday in Berlin to discuss future “reform partnerships.” The chancellor vowed to invest 300 million euros ($335 million) to help governments manage the refugee flows.

“By working together with you for your countries, we will create more security for ourselves and put people smugglers out of business,” Merkel said, the Associated Press reports.

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It's not that it would be terribly difficult to manufacture Sarin nerve gas. The small Aum Shinrikyo doomsday cult produced loads of it for attacks in Japan in the early 1990's. It's just that medieval Arabs are too stupid to handle it. They can't even do mustard gas for which the recipes are on the Internet. That saves European cities.

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95 percent of the victims of violence are men. Because women feel flattered when men fight each other and kill each other to prove that they are real men.

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An ornithologist argues for the evolution of beauty for beauty’s sake

Imagine a world created by the quest for beauty, filled with colorful dancing and governed by the principle of autonomous sexual freedom. To access this world, according to Richard Prum, you need only take a stroll outside and watch the avian rites of spring. The Evolution of Beauty represents the culmination of decades of Prum’s careful research on birds—he is the William Robertson Coe Professor of Ornithology at Yale University—including the evolution of feathers, courtship patterns, and social behavior.

Prum argues that evolutionary biologists, especially those who spend their time with mammals, have fundamentally underestimated the importance of female choice as a cause of beauty in the natural world. Throughout the book, he interweaves biological details with accounts of watching birds as a young man, field experiences, and even conversations with friends. The result reads like a memoir, argues like a manifesto, and shines with his passion for all things ornithological.

For decades, biologists have largely agreed that Darwin’s theory of mate choice works because females prefer to pair with colorful, athletic partners. Beauty, they maintained, acts as a proxy measure of evolutionary fitness; the more colorful the male’s plumage, the more resources are available on his territory, or perhaps he carries fewer parasites on his body. In other words, physiologically expensive courtship displays provide “honest” signals of a male’s quality. That they are also beautiful is beside the point.

Prum disagrees with this line of reasoning. He wants to return sexual selection theory to its roots. Prum follows Darwin’s explication in The Descent of Man (1), arguing that the spectacular courtship displays of birds such as manakins and bowerbirds cannot be explained by natural selection but rather evolved for the sake of their beauty alone—that is, beauty as perceived by the desires of females in the species.

Prum sees mate choice, and the beauty it has created, as an important—even central—mechanism of evolutionary change at almost every stage of bird evolution. For example, he suggests that the planar structure of bird feathers may have evolved to display patterned colors and was secondarily co-opted for flight. Early feathers in the evolutionary record were downy, like those of young chicks, he notes. Although they likely came in many shades, the patterned colors found in modern birds are made possible by the two-dimensional flatness of their feathers, a feature that later facilitated flight. Because the only dinosaurs to survive the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction event were those that could fly, from Prum’s perspective, this aesthetic innovation ultimately enabled their survival.

He argues, too, that female mating preferences for increased sexual autonomy were likely behind the loss of penises early in bird diversification and contributed to the origins of lekking behavior, in which a group of males compete for the attention of prospective partners. (Ducks, notoriously brutish and baroquely endowed, serve to prove his point and provide surprisingly successful fodder for dinner party repartee.)

Prum devotes the final third of the book to the evolution of sexuality in humans. Although it would be tempting to attend to differences between men and women, Prum argues that to understand our own nature, we would be better served by comparing ourselves with our ancestors and simian relatives. From this angle, human males are far less sexually aggressive than we should expect.

In comparison with male chimpanzees, human men have relatively smaller testicles, longer sex, dramatically reduced canine teeth, decreased rates of infanticide, and higher rates of homosexual interactions. These physiological and behavioral changes, Prum contends, might result from selection for female sexual autonomy and pleasure similar to that seen in birds. He hopes that other biologists will incorporate sexual selection for beauty into their own research programs on the mating (or more accurately, remating) preferences of humans.

In broad prospect, Prum’s The Evolution of Beauty argues that the aesthetic agency of individual animals lies at the heart of evolution and, over time, has created strong selection for female pleasure and desire. This represents a substantial shift from the economic metaphors of evolutionary theory that have dominated decades of evolutionary thought, in which female choice represented a mechanism devoid of desire, cold rationality without aesthetics or, indeed, true choice.

Most of all, Prum aims to reinsert idiosyncratic desires into scientific understandings of the evolution of beauty. This is not just an intellectual reformulation of biological theories of mate choice; he believes it could allow evolutionary theory to break, finally, with eugenically derived conceptions of “fitness.”

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Erectile dysfunction is mostly a vascular disease. An Egyptian professor found the solution. Botox injections into the penis, once every six month. A simple procedure that even nurses can handle.

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Mustard Poisoning

What is mustard poisoning?

Mustard poisoning happens when you are exposed to a harmful chemical called mustard gas. The chemical smells like garlic or onions. It comes in a liquid or an aerosol. An aerosol is a spray with tiny droplets of liquid. Mustard gas is used as a weapon. It may be sprayed onto people, or onto a surface that people will touch. Examples are handrails, handles, plants, and soil.

What are the signs and symptoms of mustard poisoning?

Signs and symptoms may begin 4 to 8 hours after you are exposed:

Red, burning, or itching skin

Blisters

Burning or red eyes

Sneezing, runny nose, or nosebleeds

Sore throat, hoarseness, or coughing

Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or abdominal pain

Burning in your lungs, or trouble breathing

How is mustard poisoning treated?

Small blisters may be left alone. Healthcare providers may open and clean larger blisters. You may also need any of the following:

Cool mist humidifier: This may make it easier for you to breathe and help decrease your cough.

Eye drops or ointment: This may help decrease inflammation and help your eyes heal. It may also help to keep your eyelids from sticking together.

Oxygen: You may need extra oxygen if you have difficulty breathing.

Ventilator: You may need a machine to help you breathe if you inhaled a large amount of the chemical.

What should I do if I am exposed to mustard gas?

Head to a higher area: Climb to the top floor of a building, or go to the top of a hill. Mustard gas is heavier than air and will settle in low-lying areas, such as ditches and basements.

Hold your breath and head to a safer spot: Try to hold your breath without breathing in first. Hold your breath until you can get to a safer spot. If you are outside, go inside. Close all the doors and windows. Shut off heating or air conditioning to keep outside air from coming in.

Wash your skin, hair, and eyes: Wash your hands before you touch your eyes. It is important to wash the chemical off your skin right away. Remove your clothes and place them into a plastic bag. Shower as soon as possible to wash the chemical off your skin. Use soap if it is available. Gently rinse your skin. Do not scrub your skin. If the chemical got into your eyes, run water into your eyes for 10 to 15 minutes. Put on clean clothes and shoes.

When should I seek immediate care?

Seek care immediately or call 911 if:

You think you have been exposed to mustard gas. Do not wait for signs and symptoms to appear.

Care Agreement

You have the right to help plan your care. Learn about your health condition and how it may be treated. Discuss treatment options with your caregivers to decide what care you want to receive. You always have the right to refuse treatment. The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

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The world is full of multimillionaires who can't handle money. Because, if you have money, if you don't ditch your Western wife, you will never have a harem.

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95 percent of the victims of violence are men. Because women are natural cowards who send men to handle things when they are dangerous.

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Not so cool now! Pro-rape pick-up artist pictured in a sweat-stained T-shirt at the door of his mother's home (where he lives in the BASEMENT!)

This is the man at the center of a worldwide storm after advocating legalizing rape on private property - in a sweat-stained T-shirt at the door of his mother's house.

Daryush 'Roosh' Valizadeh, 36, the self-proclaimed 'King of Masculinity' called police after receiving death threats from around the world and canceled a series of 'tribal meetings' in 45 countries set for this weekend.

Valizadeh, who is at the center of public protests at home and in Canada, Australia and the UK, is on record as advocating women be banned from voting, describing a woman's value as dependent on her 'fertility and beauty', and stating that women with eating disorders make the best girlfriends.

In a highly-criticized blog he said that if a woman was raped on private property, it should be legal.

Today he told police that it was meant to be a satirical article and that he had written it in early 2015 and had since put a disclaimer on the piece saying it was satire.

But asked when he had added the disclaimer he admitted it had been placed only 'yesterday'.

The internet geek, who has written a series of books teaching what he claims is the best way for men to use their testosterone to bed women, likes to portray himself as an global businessman.

But as the international storm grew around him today, Daily Mail Online found him in hiding at the cul-de-sac where he ekes out his vile views on his laptop - and sells ads on his website, which cost $150 a day.

Today, dressed in a stained T-shirt and shorts and living in the basement of his mother's home, he was concerned for his safety.

He said he had received death threats from around the world. He played officers voicemails left on his phone and showed them emails.

Some were from Britain, Australia and the US and warned him he would be 'shot, stabbed or have his home burned down.'

One said: 'We will kill you if you come to our city' and others were filled with vitriol, he told officers.

After dialing 911, two officers visited him and he greeted them in his work attire. One female officer only entered his doorway and he had to bring his laptop to the stoop and front hall to show her how his views on rape had backfired.

He said he had only been aiming to gain attention but had not budgeted for the worldwide anger against him and feared for his safety.

Valizadeh, who used the alias Roosh, said he was canceling the worldwide city weekend meetings of his followers after the threats.

He said he could 'no longer guarantee the safety or privacy of the men who want to attend'.

In a statement he posted online, he apologized to his supporters and said they would be let down.

Meetings had been planned around the US including Washington, New York and Los Angeles and across the globe.

Valizadeh had said he would be attending a gathering in Australia, but backed down after a public outcry there which was echoed, particularly in Britain where 80,000 signed a petition calling on the government to ban him and his meetings using hate crime laws.

He had banned homosexual men from attending as well as all women

If a pretty girl approached a man attending, his advice online to followers was 'Get her number and then tell her to buzz off. Do not allow women to attend the meeting.'

He had advised followers that feminists may attack them or male opponents, but they were not to strike back but follow the 'Gandhi principle of non violence' record incidents on cell phones.

He graduated from the University of Maryland with a degree in microbiology and soon after started a local blog called DC Bachelor

His first book called Bang was 'a textbook for picking up girls and getting laid.' He wrote several other books with the word 'Bang' in the title such as 'Day Bang'.

In America, he was placed on a 'misogyny list' by the social justice organization Southern Poverty Law Center.

Valizadeh celebrates and dwells on the title given to him when he visited Romania of 'World Don Juan.'

He says: 'I didn't try to become infamous worldwide, but that has been the outcome, all because of my teachings and ideas.

'I've been falsely accused of crimes like rape and harassment by my enemies in an attempt to shut me down, but they are too weak to defeat me.'

He has also complained about the abuse he has received over his views. One message was directed at Glasgow, Scotland, where he claimed 'I've received more threats from Glasgow than anywhere else combined. Is it some kind of convict resettlement zone?'

One Twitter user who replied was comedian and BBC broadcaster Hardeep Singh Kohli, who said: 'It's a city with a moral compass and a degree of self esteem. Try it sometime...'

Singh Kohli was suspended from his working with the broadcasters The One Show in 2009 over alleged 'inappropriate sexual behavior' towards a female colleague. No formal complaint was made and he apologized unreservedly for his behavior and later said: 'We all make mistakes and we all make misjudgments.'

A neighbor of the self proclaimed lothario said she was disgusted at his views.

Esther Eyere,33, a nursing student at Marymount University, said: 'I can't believe he can have views like that, especially about rape. It makes me sick.'

The U.K. government has called for him to be 'ridiculed' and welcomed the cancellation of his meetings.

Britain's Home Office Minister Karen Bradley told parliament today: 'The government condemns in the strongest terms anyone who condones rape and sexual violence.

'We should ridicule, we should show contempt, and we should show that these are the most ridiculous views.

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Most European women have gang rape fantasies, because their vaginas are so big that there is space for two or more dicks.

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After long wait, Japan moves to ban possession of child pornography

CNN

In most of Japan, it's still legal to possess child pornography. Although production and distribution have been banned for 15 years, Japan lags behind other major developed nations in forbidding people from simply holding the sinister material.

That is about to change in a country regarded as a global nexus of child pornography. The country's upper house of parliament is expected to pass legislation this month making possession of it a crime punishable by up to a year in prison. Children's rights activists have applauded the step, although their reaction is tempered with frustration that it has taken such a long time.

"As a member of a group that's been hearing the voice of the victims for many years, we welcome the news," said Shihoko Fujiwara, a representative of Lighthouse, a nonprofit group that helps exploited children. "Japan took so long, and it is too late to reach this decision as a developed country."

The proposed law, which was already approved by the lower house of parliament this week, comes with a couple of noteworthy loopholes. When it goes into effect, it will give those already in possession of child pornography a year to dispose of it.

And it won't cover the country's popular manga (comic book) and anime (animation) industries, which include depictions of violent sexual abuse of children in their publications.

Fujiwara said a discussion about some of the imagery in manga and anime -- content that would be illegal in many Western countries -- would be a natural "next step."

'A necessary evil'

But representatives of those industries say that while they support the ban on real child pornography, any move to censor their products would be an unjustified restriction of freedom of expression. Daisuke Okeda, a lawyer and inspector for the Japan Animation Creators Association, said it was "natural that animation is exempted."

"The goal of the law itself is to protect children from crime," he said. "Banning such expression in animation under this law would not satisfy the goal of the law."

Okeda said that no studies have been done that prove any link between pedophilia and animation in Japan.

Hiroshi Chiba, the manager of Chiba Tetsuya Production, one of the country's best known manga production houses, said that more could be done in terms of age restrictions on graphic content featuring children and to distinguish it more clearly from other comics. And he admitted that some products of the industry leave him and his colleagues "disgusted."

"But rich, deep culture is born from something that might not be accepted by all," Chiba said. "We need to allow the gray zone to exist as a necessary evil."

'An international hub'

Some experts counter that children suffer in a culture that appears to tolerate images of child sexual abuse.

Hiromasa Nakai, a public affairs officer for UNICEF in Japan, pointed to the graphic content in manga, anime and some video games, as well as the "junior idol" genre of books and DVDs that display minors wearing tiny bikinis and striking sexual poses.

Japan should do more -- beyond the proposed law change -- "to protect the best interest of children," Nakai said.

Statistics show that child pornography remains a big problem in Japan.

The U.S. State Department's 2013 report on human rights practices in Japan labels the country "an international hub for the production and trafficking of child pornography."

It cited Japanese police data showing the number of child pornography investigations in 2012 rose 9.7% from a year earlier to a record of 1,596. The cases involved 1,264 child victims, almost twice as many as in the previous year.

The fact that possession remains legal, for the time being, "continued to hamper police efforts to enforce the law effectively and participate fully in international law enforcement," the report said.

Girls as sex objects

One local authority already took matters into its own hands. The prefecture of Kyoto in central Japan introduced a ban on possession of child pornography in 2011.

But Nakai said addressing the problems isn't just a matter for government, suggesting parents, the media, the private sector and even children themselves can play a role in improving the situation. The portrayal of young girls as sex objects in Japan has long raised eyebrows among Westerners.

An article in Wired in 1999 reeled off a list of examples in Tokyo: "Vending machines sell schoolgirls' used panties, which the girls sell to middlemen. 'Image bars' specialize in escorts dressed in school uniforms. Telephone clubs feature bored adolescent girls earning spending money by talking dirty. Sex shops sell a porn magazine called 'Anatomical Illustrations of Junior High School Girls.'"

Some experts suggest the situation is born out of Japan's long-established patriarchal society.

Whatever the cause, changing a culture may prove a lot harder than changing a law.

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Demography is destiny. That is why Saudi Arabia and Qatar have established billion-dollar funds to provide financial support for every child born in Europe to a Muslim parent. The money is available through mosque charities.

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Blogger 'not welcome' here: Canadian mayors tell Roosh V

The mayors of several major Canadian cities are adding their voice to the growing backlash against a controversial American blogger who’s behind a series of men’s meetups planned for this weekend.

The so-called “pick-up artist” Daryush Valizadeh, known online as “Roosh V,” also runs the website Return of Kings, which is described as a forum for “heterosexual, masculine men.”

An international Return of Kings meetup day is scheduled to take place in 43 countries around the globe, including 10 Canadian cities, on Saturday.

On Tuesday, Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson took to Twitter to publically tell Return of Kings supporters that their “pro-rape, misogynistic, homophobic garbage is not welcome in Ottawa.”

Watson is also asking venues in the city to deny renting space to the group to hold the meetup.

A number of other Canadian mayors quickly followed suit and decried the meetings.

Watson is also asking venues in the city to deny renting space to the group to hold the meetup.

A number of other Canadian mayors quickly followed suit and decried the meetings.

The Canadian meetings are apparently scheduled for Calgary, Edmonton, Montreal, Ottawa, Surrey, B.C, Toronto, Vancouver, Victoria, Winnipeg and Windsor.

Tenets of the “neomasculinity” beliefs promoted on the blog include the notion that a woman’s value depends on her fertility and beauty. Among some of Valizadeh’s most controversial writings includes a blog post where he wrote that rape should be “made legal on private property.”

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The patriarchy as political system is defined as rule by benevolent mature men. It has a proven track record in history. And you can't get anything better than it.

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